Risk Disclosure Statement for Futures and Options

January 12, 2024

This brief statement does not disclose all of the risks and other significant aspects of trading in futures and options. In light of the risks, you should undertake such transactions only if you understand the nature of the contracts and contractual relationships into which you are entering and the extent of your exposure to risk. Trading in futures and options is not suitable for many members of the public. You should carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you in light of your experience, objectives, financial resources and other relevant circumstances.

The factual information on this website has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not necessarily all-inclusive and is not guaranteed as to the accuracy, and is not to be construed as representation by Tradier Futures or its affiliates. The risk of trading can be substantial and each investor and/or trader must consider whether this is a suitable investment. Past performance, whether actual or indicated by simulated historical tests of strategies, is not necessarily indicative of future results. Tradier Futures is a member of the National Futures Association ("NFA").

1. Effect of 'Leverage' or 'Gearing.'
Transactions in futures carry a high degree of risk. The amount of initial margin is small relative to the value of the futures contract so that transactions are 'leveraged' or 'geared.' A relatively small market movement will have a proportionately larger impact on the funds you have deposited or will have to deposit; this may work against you as well as for you. You may sustain a total loss of initial margin funds and any additional funds deposited with the firm to maintain your position. If the market moves against your position or margin levels are increased, you may be called upon to pay substantial additional funds on short notice to maintain your position. If you fail to comply with a request for additional funds within the time prescribed, your position may be liquidated at a loss and you will be liable for any resulting deficit.

2. Risk-reducing orders or strategies.
The placing of certain orders (e.g. 'stop-loss' orders, where permitted under local law, or 'stop-limit' orders) which are intended to limit losses to certain amounts may not be effective because market conditions may make it impossible to execute such orders. Strategies using combinations of positions, such as 'spread' and 'straddle' positions may be as risky as taking simple 'long' or 'short' positions.

OPTIONS

3. Variable degree of risk.
Transactions in options carry a high degree of risk. Purchasers and sellers of options should familiarize themselves with the type of option (i.e. put or call) which they contemplate trading and the associated risks. You should calculate the extent to which the value of the options must increase for your position to become profitable, taking into account the premium and all transaction costs. The purchaser of options may offset or exercise the options or allow the options to expire. The exercise of an option results either in a cash settlement or in the purchaser acquiring or delivering the underlying interest. If the option is on a future, the purchaser will acquire a futures position with associated liabilities for margin (see the section on Futures above). If the purchased options expire worthless, you will suffer a total loss of your investment which will consist of the option premium plus transaction costs. If you are contemplating purchasing deep -out-of-the-money options, you should be aware that the chance of such options becoming profitable ordinarily is remote. Selling ('writing' or 'granting') an option generally entails considerably greater risk than purchasing options.

Although the premium received by the seller is fixed, the seller may sustain a loss well in excess of that amount. The seller will be liable for additional margin to maintain the position if the market moves unfavorably. The seller will also be exposed to the risk of the purchaser exercising the option and the seller will be obligated to either settle the option in cash or to acquire or deliver the underlying interest. If the option is on a future, the seller will acquire a position in a future with associated liabilities for margin (see the section on Futures above). If the position is 'covered' by the seller holding a corresponding position in the underlying interest or a future or another option, the risk may be reduced. If the option is not covered, the risk of loss can be unlimited. Certain exchanges in some jurisdictions permit deferred payment of the option premium, exposing the purchaser to liability for margin payments not exceeding the amount of the premium. The purchaser is still subject to the risk of losing the premium and transaction costs. When the option is exercised or expires, the purchaser is responsible for any unpaid premium outstanding at that time.

4. Terms and conditions of contracts.
You should ask the firm with which you deal about the term and conditions of the specific futures or options which you are trading and associated obligations (e.g. the circumstances under which you may become obligated to make or take delivery of the underlying interest of a futures contract and, in respect of options, expiration dates and restrictions on the time for exercise). Under certain circumstances the specifications of outstanding contracts (including the exercise price of an option) may be modified by the exchange or clearing house to reflect changes in the underlying interest.

5. Suspension or restriction of trading and pricing relationships.
Market conditions (e.g. illiquidity) and/or the operation of the rules of certain markets (e.g. the suspension of trading in any contract or contract month because of price limits or 'circuit breakers') may increase the risk of loss by making it difficult or impossible to effect transactions or liquidate/offset positions. If you have sold options, this may increase the risk of loss. Further, normal pricing relationships between the underlying interest and the future, and the underlying interest and the option may not exist. This can occur when, for example, the futures contract underlying the option is subject to price limits while the option is not. The absence of an underlying reference price may make it difficult to judge 'fair' value.

6. Deposited cash and property.
You should familiarize yourself with the protections accorded money or other property you deposit for domestic and foreign transactions, particularly in the event of a firm insolvency or bankruptcy. The extent to which you may recover your money or property may be governed by specified legislation or local rules. In some jurisdictions, property which had been specifically identifiable as your own will be pro–rated in the same manner as cash for purposes of distribution in the event of a shortfall.

7. Commission and other charges.
Before you begin to trade, you should obtain a clear explanation of all commission, fees and other charges for which you will be liable. These charges will affect your net profit (if any) or increase your loss.

8. Transactions in other jurisdictions.
Transactions on markets in other jurisdictions, including markets formally linked to a domestic market, may expose you to additional risk. Such markets may be subject to regulation which may offer different or diminished investor protection. Before you trade should inquire about any rules relevant to your particular transactions. Your local regulatory authority will be unable to compel the enforcement of the rules of regulatory authorities or markets in other jurisdictions where your transactions have been effected. You should ask the firm with which you deal for details about the types of redress available in both your home jurisdiction and other relevant jurisdictions before you start to trade.

9. Currency risks.
The profit or loss in transactions in foreign currency-denominated contracts (whether they are traded in your own or another jurisdiction) will be affected by fluctuations in currency rates where there is a need to convert from the currency denomination of the contract to another currency.

10. Trading facilities.
Most open-outcry and electronic trading facilities are supported by computer-based component systems for the order-routing, execution, matching, registration or clearing of trades. As with all facilities and systems, they are vulnerable to temporary disruption or failure. Your ability to recover certain losses may be subject to limits on liability imposed by the system provider, the market, the clearing house and/or member firms. Such limits may vary; you should ask the firm with which you deal for details in this respect.

11. Electronic trading.
Trading on an electronic trading system may differ not only from trading in an open-outcry market but also from trading on other electronic trading systems. If you undertake transactions on an electronic trading system, you will be exposed to risk associated with the system including the failure of hardware and software. The result of any system failure may be that your order is either not executed according to your instructions or is not executed at all.

12. Off-exchange transactions.
In some jurisdictions, and only then in restricted circumstances, firms are permitted to effect off-exchange transactions. The firm with which you deal may be acting as your counterparty to the transaction. It may be difficult or impossible to liquidate an existing position, to assess the value, to determine a fair price or to assess the exposure to risk. For these reasons, these transactions may involve increased risks. Off exchange transactions may be less regulated or subject to a separate regulatory regime. Before you undertake such transactions, you should familiarize yourself with applicable rules and attendant risks.

13. FOREX:
Trading cash Foreign Exchange ("FX") contracts carries the same high level of risk as futures trading (Futures Trading Disclaimer). However cash FX, unlike futures FX contracts that are regulated by the Commodity Trading Futures Commission, are not regulated by any governmental agency. In addition, because there is not a central clearing house for cash FX transactions, there is also a counterparty risk for each contact. Trading Foreign Exchange carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. There is a possibility that you could sustain a loss of all or more of your investment therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with Foreign Exchange trading.

14. Crypto or Digital Currency Products
PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT TRADIER FUTURES IS A MEMBER OF NFA AND IS SUBJECT TO NFA'S REGULATORY OVERSIGHT AND EXAMINATIONS. HOWEVER, YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT NFA DOES NOT HAVE REGULATORY OVERSIGHT AUTHORITY OVER UNDERLYING OR SPOT VIRTUAL CURRENCY PRODUCTS OR TRANSACTIONS OR VIRTUAL CURRENCY EXCHANGES, CUSTODIANS OR MARKETS. PURSUANT TO NFA RULES TRADIER FUTURES IS REQUIRED TO PROVIDE YOU WITH THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS PUBLISHED BY NFA AND THE CFTC:

  • NFA INVESTOR ADVISORY – FUTURES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES INCLUDING BITCOIN
  • CFTC CUSTOMER ADVISORY - UNDERSTAND THE RISKS OF VIRTUAL CURRENCY TRADING

There are a number of risks which are unique to trading in virtual currency products. Prior to entering into any virtual currency investment, you should be aware of and understand the following risks:

Virtual Currency Is Not Legal Tender: Virtual currencies are not legal tender in the United States. Many question whether they even have intrinsic value. The price of many virtual currencies is based on the agreement of the parties to a transaction. As a result, virtual currencies including Bitcoins experience significant price volatility and fluctuations in the underlying virtual currency's value. The time you place a trade for a virtual currency contract and the time you attempt to liquidate it will affect the value and the potential profit or losses related to it. Please be aware that investing in futures on virtual currencies, including Bitcoin, even those which are traded on regulated futures exchanges, does not mean that the underlying virtual currency markets are regulated in any manner. What occurs in a virtual currency's underlying market will impact the price of a virtual currency's futures contract.

Price Volatility: The price of a virtual currency is based on the perceived value of the virtual currency and subject to changes in sentiment, which make these products highly volatile. Certain virtual currencies have routinely experienced daily price volatility of more than 20%. The risks associated with the extreme price volatility of virtual currencies and the possibility of rapid and substantial price movements could result in significant losses.

Valuation and Liquidity: Virtual currencies can be traded through privately negotiated transactions and through numerous virtual currency exchanges and intermediaries around the world. The lack of a centralized pricing source poses a variety of valuation challenges. In addition, the dispersed liquidity may pose challenges for market participants trying to exit a position, particularly during periods of stress. Valuation policies and procedures throughout the virtual currency landscape may not be uniform. Although digital currency futures traded on regulated exchanges may have a uniform valuation policy, the underlying spot market virtual currencies those policies are based upon may not be reliable under periods of market stress.

Cybersecurity: The cybersecurity risks of virtual currencies and related “wallets” or spot exchanges include hacking vulnerabilities and a risk that publicly distributed ledgers may not be immutable. A cybersecurity event could result in a substantial, immediate and irreversible loss for market participants that trade virtual currencies. Even a minor cybersecurity event in a virtual currency is likely to result in downward price pressure on that product and potentially other virtual currencies.

Opaque Spot Market: Virtual currency balances are generally maintained as an address on the blockchain and are accessed through private keys, which may be held by a market participant or a custodian. Although virtual currency transactions are typically publicly available on a blockchain or distributed ledger, the public address does not identify the controller, owner or holder of the private key. Unlike bank and brokerage accounts, virtual currency exchanges and custodians that hold virtual currencies do not always identify the owner. The opaque underlying or spot market poses asset verification challenges for market participants, regulators and auditors and gives rise to an increased risk of manipulation and fraud, including the potential for Ponzi schemes, bucket shops and pump and dump schemes. This type of behavior within the spot market may lead to additional risks in futures products traded on regulated exchanges.

Virtual Currency Exchanges, Intermediaries and Custodians: Virtual currency exchanges, as well as other intermediaries, custodians and vendors used to facilitate virtual currency transactions, are relatively new and largely unregulated in both the United States and many foreign jurisdictions. Virtual currency exchanges generally purchase virtual currencies for their own account on the public ledger and allocate positions to customers through internal bookkeeping entries while maintaining exclusive control of the private keys. Under this structure, virtual currency exchanges collect large amounts of customer funds for the purpose of buying and holding virtual currencies on behalf of their customers. The opaque underlying spot market and lack of regulatory oversight creates a risk that a virtual currency exchange may not hold sufficient virtual currencies and funds to satisfy its obligations and that such deficiency may not be easily identified or discovered. In addition, many virtual currency exchanges have experienced significant outages, downtime and transaction processing delays, have halted redemptions or withdrawals, and may have a higher level of operational risk than regulated futures or securities exchanges. The impact of failures within unregulated virtual currency exchanges, intermediaries, or virtual currency custodians could have a material impact on virtual currency futures traded through a regulated exchange.

Regulatory Landscape: Virtual currencies currently face an uncertain regulatory landscape in the United States and many foreign jurisdictions. In the United States, virtual currencies are not subject to federal regulatory oversight but may be regulated by one or more state regulatory bodies. In addition, many virtual currency derivatives are regulated by the CFTC, and the SEC has cautioned that many initial coin offerings are likely to fall within the definition of a security and subject to U.S. securities laws. One or more jurisdictions may, in the future, adopt laws, regulations or directives that affect virtual currency networks and their users. Such laws, regulations or directives may impact the price of virtual currencies and their acceptance by users, merchants and service providers. Since new regulatory developments are unpredictable and largely unknown, you should be aware that decisions in this area may impact your ability to invest in virtual currency products including regulated exchange cleared futures.

Technology: The relatively new and rapidly evolving technology underlying virtual currencies introduces unique risks. For example, a unique private key is required to access, use or transfer a virtual currency on a blockchain or distributed ledger. The loss, theft or destruction of a private key may result in an irreversible loss. The ability to participate in forks could also have implications for investors. For example, a market participant holding a virtual currency position through a virtual currency exchange may be adversely impacted if the exchange does not allow its customers to participate in a fork that creates a new product. Virtual currencies are underpinned by nascent technology. You should ensure that you are familiar with the technology risk posed to you when making a crypto currency investment even in a regulated exchange cleared product.

Transaction Fees: Many virtual currencies allow market participants to offer miners (i.e., parties that process transactions and record them on a blockchain or distributed ledger) a fee. While not mandatory, a fee is generally necessary to ensure that a transaction is promptly recorded on a blockchain or distributed ledger. The amounts of these fees are subject to market forces and it is possible that the fees could increase substantially during a period of stress. In addition, virtual currency exchanges, wallet providers and other custodians may charge high fees relative to custodians in many other financial markets. The impact of these transaction fees on the underlying spot market value of digital assets may impact the price of regulated virtual currency futures in unpredictable ways. Please note that Tradier Futures earns rebates when you trade Nano BTC and other products by Coinbase Derivatives.

Margin Risks: Tradier Futures and/or our Clearing FCMs reserve the right to impose more restrictive limits that may, at our FCM's discretion, be revised from time to time. Tradier Futures, and/or our Clearing FCMs also has the contractual right to liquidate all or any part of your position(s) through any means available, without prior notice to you. The regular risks associated with trading commodity futures contracts also apply to the trading of regulated digital currency futures. These risks can be reviewed at your respective FCM's website or within your account opening paperwork.

Liquidity Risks: Digital currency futures contracts have limited history trading on a U.S.-regulated futures exchange. As noted throughout the various risks disclosed above, the price of the underlying digital currency indexes on which the futures contracts are based upon can be and often are highly volatile or unpredictable. Further, a limited number of futures commissions merchants may offer trading in digital currency futures contracts to their customers. For all of these reasons, and others which may as yet be unknown to Tradier Futures, there might be limited volume or liquidity in digital currency futures. Limited liquidity or low volumes of transactions within these markets may impact market efficiencies and price movements. Each customer should conduct his or her own due diligence prior to make a decision to trade in these products. The following link from the National Futures Association should be considered for more information. https://www.nfa.futures.org/investors/investor-advisory.html

Additionally, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC") has made available a Virtual Currency Resource Web Page designed to educate and inform the public about this topic and its risks. See the link that follows for further information from the CFTC: http://www.cftc.gov/bitcoin/index.htm.

DISCLAIMER

Futures and options trading involves substantial risk of loss and is not suitable for every investor. The valuation of futures and options may fluctuate, and, as a result, clients may lose more than their original investment. The impact of seasonal and geopolitical events is already factored into market prices. The highly leveraged nature of futures trading means that small market movements will have a great impact on your trading account and this can work against you, leading to large losses or can work for you, leading to large gains. If the market moves against you, you may sustain a total loss greater than the amount you deposited into your account.

You are responsible for all the risks and financial resources you use and for the chosen trading system. You should not engage in trading unless you fully understand the nature of the transactions you are entering into and the extent of your exposure to loss. If you do not fully understand these risks you must seek independent advice from your financial advisor. All trading strategies are used at your own risk. This software should not be relied upon as advice or construed as providing recommendations of any kind. It is your responsibility to confirm and decide which trades to make. Trade only with risk capital; that is, trade with money that, if lost, will not adversely impact your lifestyle and your ability to meet your financial obligations.

Past results are no indication of future performance.

In no event should the content of this correspondence be construed as an express or implied promise, guarantee or implication from Tradier Futures that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. Tradier Futures is not responsible for any losses incurred as a result of using any trading strategy and software. Autotrading Strategies should never be left unattended due to the possibility of events out of your control, such as computer or data failure, power outages, position mismatches, and/or network problems. Loss-limiting strategies such as stop loss orders may not be effective because market conditions or technological issues may make it impossible to execute such orders. Likewise, strategies using combinations of options and/or futures positions such as "spread" or "straddle" trades may be just as risky as simple long and short positions. Information provided in this correspondence is intended solely for informational purposes and is obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Information is in no way guaranteed. No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are attempted.

Tradier Tradier Tradier Inc.
Tradier Brokerage Inc.
Member FINRA/SIPC.

3420 Toringdon Way, Suite 300
Charlotte, NC 28277
Phone: 980.272.3880
Email: service@tradierbrokerage.com

Apple Store Download Google Play Store Download TradingView Link
© Tradier Inc. All rights reserved.